Human-Computer Interaction 3e Dix, Finlay, Abowd, Beale

exercises  -  16. dialogue notations and design

EXERCISE 16.7 [extra - not in book]

(cross-refer to Chapter 7) How can interface designers ensure that their designs do not breach principles such as consistency, predictability and reachability?

answer available for tutors only

By designing their systems carefully and using evaluative dialog design methods, such as state transition networks, that can be analysed to identify inconsistent use of navigation commands, non-determinism leading to lack of predictability and states that cannot be reached from a given point.

By evaluating their systems throughout the design process using both analytic methods such as cognitive walkthrough and heuristic evaluation, and user testing (observation, questionnaires, etc.).


Other exercises in this chapter

ex.16.1 (ans), ex.16.2 (ans), ex.16.3 (ans), ex.16.4 (ans), ex.16.5 (tut), ex.16.6 (tut), ex.16.7 (tut), ex.16.8 (tut), ex.16.9 (tut), ex.16.10 (tut), ex.16.11 (open)

all exercises for this chapter


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